Bass Boss

So for my devoted readers I decided I need to change it up, and get back to my roots writing about music. It’s something I love, and I get to know the artists on a different level. The first artist I decided to write about was Amadeezy- a Boston fixture on the dj scene, and influential producer on the international level. A dude doing it big like foreheads at a bald men’s convention.

Amadeezy is known as the Bass Boss- a moniker that comes from his breakout track last year released on the German record label FTP. The track was a throwback to the miami bass music that he listened to in the 90’s and the whole record is an homage to that style- a style that is like covid cocaine- dirty, raw, and something you can’t stop desiring.

Through email I went back and forth asking Amadeezy some wide ranging questions of how he developed his style, and how this gorgeous vulgar bass music was developed. First up was everyone’s favorite token question where his inspiration came from? 

“I have a huge range and pretty much draw most of my inspiration from rap music and old school urban dance music as far as production goes. My style comes more from my appreciation of underground music and my punk rock ethos of DIY and using simple music structure effectively. Some DJ’s that really influenced my sound would be a huge list but in a nutshell DJ D-Bert cause I started out my DJ career doing DJ battles in the 90’s, DJ Paul from three six mafia, DJ Screw,  Uncle Luke, DJ Deeon, DJ Magic Mike, Premier, DJ Godfather, Rashad, and more recently my homey Textasy that runs the label FTP outta Berlin.” 

Next I am curious how Boston has helped, and, or, hindered you as far as your career?

“Boston was a great place in the 90’s for underground culture. From punk to hip hop / rap and some of the house music and underground rave parties that occurred I drew a lot of my personal style and kind of mixed it all together to get the Bass Boss sound. As far as hindering me it’s become a really commercial city as far as music goes with gentrification being common in most major cities it’s just become a place with very little appreciation for music outside the scope of the mainstream.”  

What got you into djing? Producing? Bass music? 

Well the movie juice was what originally got me interested in turntablism and from there I eventually got into making music about ten years ago when production equipment became more software based cause it was affordable. I started making music similar to what I do now in the very early days of producing but there wasn’t as much of a market for underground urban club music at that time. It wasn’t until about a year or two ago that I realized that there was a bigger audience for the stuff I’ve always loved like miami bass, ghetto house, juke, baltimore club, electro, breaks, etc.

How did your teenage years influence your overall direction and sound?

Well I grew up in Mattapan and kind of shuffled around the south shore in Quincy and Brockton later in my life. Think hip hop culture, graffiti, raves, and punk rock other than making me a juvenile delinquent just gave me an appreciation of street culture. I’m very much a city kid and having grown up in the hood I was always interested in discovering music and underground culture that was being made by people with a similar upbringing to mine. 

So, with a future that looks brighter than a psychedelic care bear covered in diamonds, what’s next for you?

“My biggest goal is to go and perform overseas. I was slated for my first European tour which would’ve started in June in London, but due to covid 19 everything obviously was cancelled. Right now I’m working on a ton of stuff and am dropping a west coast style electro EP thats an hommage to 90’s g funk mixed with west coast style electro in the style of producers like Arabian Prince, Egyptian Lover, etc. This EP is slated for later this year and is dropping on International Chrome which is Jensen Interceptor and Assembler Code’s imprint. Hoping to also record a full length album that showcases all my musical influences in a cohesive way that best represents all the random ass knowledge I’ve acquired on this journey.”

As far as Contemporaries- who are you listening to now, and who are those pushing you to become even better?

“Partiboi69, Textasy, Big Dope P, Jensen Interceptor, Turk Turkelton, Raw Takes, Cyan 85, DJ Swagger, LUZIE, Sansibar, and so many. Mostly the pioneers too. I’m a big fan of the old school as far as dance music and the pioneers. I’d like to be remembered not as a pioneer by my peers but definitely am hoping to reach that legendary status of American ghetto style production.”

Big thanks to Amadeezy for the interview! Make sure to buy his music including his latest single Jackeveli, and the b side remix that’s more wavy than a sumo wrestler’s belly with a remix of his club killer track Deadly Disco Poison by Feadz! https://amadeezy.bandcamp.com/music

And you can follow him on Instagram.

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